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Thread: Wines: Cooking Sherry vs. Dry Sherry

  1. #1
    JOHN CZEPKOWSKI
    Guest JOHN CZEPKOWSKI's Avatar

    Default Wines: Cooking Sherry vs. Dry Sherry

    What is the difference between Cooking Sherry vs Dry Sherry. The recipe
    calls for Dry Sherry - isn't that the same as cooking Sherry? The Cooking
    Sherry only has 2g of sugar per 2 Tbsp serving - does that make it sweet? I
    know it has salt in it that drinkable sherry would not contain. Thanks for
    your replies. Mark

  2. #2
    st.helier
    Guest st.helier's Avatar

    Default Wines: Cooking Sherry vs. Dry Sherry

    What is the difference between Cooking Sherry vs Dry Sherry.
    From Wikipedia ..

    "Sherry is a fortified wine, made in and around the town of Jerez, Spain and
    hence in Spanish it is called "Vino de Jerez".

    Spanish producers have registered the names Jerez / Xérès / Sherry and will
    prosecute producers of similar fortified wines from other places using the
    same name.

    According to Spanish law, Sherry must come from the triangular area of the
    province of Cádiz between Jerez, Sanlúcar de Barrameda, and El Puerto de
    Santa María.

    However the name 'Sherry' is used as a semi-generic in the United States
    where it must be labeled with a region of origin such as American Sherry or
    California Sherry.

    Sherry differs from other wines because, after fermentation is complete, it
    is fortified with brandy.

    Because the fortification takes place after fermentation, all natural
    sherries are dry; any sweetness is applied later."

    Effectively, there is no such thing as "Cooking Sherry". No producer would
    make a product deliberately "downgraded" so that a product would not be
    suitable for drinking.

    Similarly, I would never consider using *any* wine in my cooking (be it
    sherry or otherwise) which I would not be prepared to drink, in its own
    right.

    Of course (I am making an assumption) you *may* live somewhere where some
    sort of cheap, semi-generic, fortified abomination may be marketed as
    "cooking sherry".

    IMHO (and brand me elitist if you will!), if you have an ounce of pride in
    what you are preparing, I would not be using this type of "stuff" in
    anything I prepared.

    --

    st.helier

  3. #3
    Anders Tørneskog
    Guest Anders Tørneskog's Avatar

    Default Wines: Cooking Sherry vs. Dry Sherry

    I once owned a cookbook with a recipe for "Canard Margaux". It used a
    WHOLE BOTTLE of Ch.Margaux in which to cook the duck!
    Quite believable.
    80 years ago Margaux, Latour and their likes were horrendously expensive -
    2, 3 even 5 times the price of ordinary red wine. 30 cents for generic St.
    Emilion, 1.40USD for Latour 1916 or 1.00USD for Petrus 1916 according to a
    1927 price list. A difference well corresponding to actual quality...
    (sigh)
    Anders

    (And the expensivest from that list? Ch. d'Yquem 1916 2.85USD and Alsheimer
    Goldberg Auslese, yes, Rhine wine, at 1.75USD)

  4. #4
    JOHN CZEPKOWSKI
    Guest JOHN CZEPKOWSKI's Avatar

    Default Wines: Cooking Sherry vs. Dry Sherry

    What is the difference between Cooking Sherry vs Dry Sherry. The recipe calls for Dry Sherry - isn't that the same as cooking Sherry? The Cooking
    Sherry only has 2g of sugar per 2 Tbsp serving - does that make it sweet? I
    know it has salt in it that drinkable sherry would not contain. Thanks for
    your replies. Mark
    I believe the high salt content gives cooking sherry a different
    legal status (my recollection is that it isn't taxed as an alcoholic
    beverage, and may even be sold to under-age buyers). Practically
    speaking, if you use sherry intended for drinking, you may need
    to add more salt, since a recipe calling for cooking sherry already
    takes into the account the salt content.
    Thanks Dana, but the recipe calls for dry sherry (so I wouldn't have to
    subtract the salt - some trick).

    The salt helps the sherry "keep" longer since I may not be cooking a whole
    duck for instance as in a previous reply.

    I guess my concern is more about whether the cooking sherry is sweet vs dry
    considering the 2g of sugar per 2 Tbsp serving. It would appear that it is
    sweet and not all the sugar was gobbled up by the yeasties which would make
    it dry. I know that some yeasts die off before all the sugar is fermented
    but I don't know where the cut off is between sweet and dry sherry. If I
    worded the inital question better, I may have gotten the answer for which I
    was searching. I appreciate all inputs.

    Mark

  5. #5
    AyTee
    Guest AyTee's Avatar

    Default Wines: Cooking Sherry vs. Dry Sherry

    I believe the high salt content gives cooking sherry a different
    legal status (my recollection is that it isn't taxed as an alcoholic
    beverage, and may even be sold to under-age buyers). Practically
    speaking, if you use sherry intended for drinking, you may need
    to add more salt, since a recipe calling for cooking sherry already
    takes into the account the salt content.
    Dry means (virtually) no sugar. 2g per 2 T is a lot of sugar for a
    wine. Therefor your cooking sherry is not dry.

    Andy

  6. #6
    JOHN CZEPKOWSKI
    Guest JOHN CZEPKOWSKI's Avatar

    Default Wines: Cooking Sherry vs. Dry Sherry

    Dry means (virtually) no sugar. 2g per 2 T is a lot of sugar for a
    wine. Therefor your cooking sherry is not dry.

    Andy
    Thanks Andy that answers my question.

    Mark

  7. #7
    cwdjrxyz
    Guest cwdjrxyz's Avatar

    Default Wines: Cooking Sherry vs. Dry Sherry

    What is the difference between Cooking Sherry vs Dry Sherry. The recipe calls for Dry Sherry - isn't that the same as cooking Sherry? The Cooking
    Sherry only has 2g of sugar per 2 Tbsp serving - does that make it sweet? I
    know it has salt in it that drinkable sherry would not contain. Thanks for
    your replies. Mark
    Since many who post and read this groups are not in the US, perhaps it
    is worth mentioning a little US history. In the early 1900s when
    alcohol was made illegal in all of the US, there were some exceptions
    to the law. A bit of wine could be made and sold for religious
    sacrements. Also one could make a certain amount of wine at home for
    personal use if certain rules were followed. Alcohol also was allowed
    in certain products including medicine, flavor extracts, etc. where
    the product was such that many poeple would not drink it for the
    alcohol. Cooking wine that contained a lot of salt could be sold,
    because not many people would drink much of it. Alcohol could be
    denatured with several additives for use in solvents for various
    purpose. There were volumes of details and restrictions describing
    legal uses of alcohol.

    Alcohol became legal again in the 1930s, but individual states, or
    even such a small subdivision as a township could vote to remain dry,
    and many did. Some would allow sales of beer, but not spirits and
    wine. There still are a few local small devisions of states in the US
    that remain dry. There are yet more that allow sales for home use, but
    do not allow sales in bars and restaurants. Thus a small market for
    cooking wine containing a lot of salt remains to this day. Cooking
    "Sherry" seems to be the most common cooking wine. The thing to
    remember is the salt added to the wine. If much wine is used, the salt
    added to the dish should be reduced. If something is cooked in a lot
    of wine and a sauce is made from the reduced cooking liquid, cooking
    wine may make the dish too salty even if no other salt is added to the
    dish.

    Then there are a few people still very anti-alcohol who would not be
    seen in a liquor store in case their friends might think they are
    drinking alcohol. There are several religions in the US that are very
    anti-alcohol. And of course good Moslems do not drink alcohol. Good
    Mormons do not drink alcohol or coffee. Most of those who I have met
    who do not drink alcohol will tolerate a bit of alcohol in a flavoring
    such as cooking wine or vanilla extract, since the nature of the
    product prevents most people from drinking enough to produce symptoms
    of alcohol intake. But there are a very few who will not knowingly
    consume anything containing alcohol. Of course everyone has a tiny bit
    of alcohol in them that is produced in the body by reactions
    concerning digestion of food.

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