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Thread: Most remote place in Scotland

  1. #1
    Adam Lea
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    Default Most remote place in Scotland

    Does anyone know what the most remote place in mainland Scotland is,
    defined by distance to the nearest public road as the crow flies?

  2. #2
    Tim W
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    Default Most remote place in Scotland

    It will be on St Kilda for sure. But you meant on the mainland I expect.

  3. #3
    Tim W
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    Default Most remote place in Scotland

    It will be on St Kilda for sure. But you meant on the mainland I expect.
    Doh! that would be why you wrote 'mainland'. Excuse me for being a
    stupid clever ....

    Tim w

  4. #4
    Graham Seed
    Guest Graham Seed's Avatar

    Default Most remote place in Scotland

    Having a shuftie at my maps I think it is somewhere between the River
    Feshie and Tarf Water in the region of Beinn Bhreac and Carn an Fhidhleir.
    Yes, must be somewhere around there. The 1:250000 road map shows minor
    public roads with a hard line and other roads/tracks with a pecked outline
    (most of the time), so I make it a point equidistant from the roads near
    Bridge of Tilt, Auchlean and Linn of Dee which is around 16km and somewhere
    on the col between An Sgarsoch and Carn an Fhidhleir.

    Somewhere near Camusrory in Knoydart would have come close but the road at
    Inverie is 'public'.

    Anyone beat 16km?

    Graham

  5. #5
    Peter Clinch
    Guest Peter Clinch's Avatar

    Default Most remote place in Scotland

    Does anyone know what the most remote place in mainland Scotland is,
    defined by distance to the nearest public road as the crow flies?
    Strikes me as an odd way to define it, because you've got places
    relatively close to roads straight across a loch or sound which are
    nonetheless incredibly remote from a /driver/ who doesn't have a boat or
    is a remarkably good swimmer!

    But you also have places like Tarbet (Loch Nevis, not Lomond) which are
    served by a passenger ferry, which are on the one hand a few miles from
    anywhere else and not actually on a road, but there's a village(-ette)
    there so it can't be /that/ remote.

    I don't know the answer, but I'd personally redefine the criteria a bit.
    As the crow with a broken wing hops from a road, habitation or landing
    jetty, perhaps...

    Pete.

  6. #6
    Graham Seed
    Guest Graham Seed's Avatar

    Default Most remote place in Scotland

    The public road at Bridge of Tilt goes as far as Baile na Bruaich in Glen
    Fender so the furtherst point from a public road is at NN 918833 which is
    15.7 km from those three points.

    You can probably cycle to within 2.5 km of there along the estate road
    past the ruined Geldie Lodge.
    Not that I'm a cyclist, but I've been checking out the private roads with
    Google and the road/path which goes via Gaick (most remote lodge?) over to
    Pitlochrie seems a great tick.

    Pete?

    Graham

  7. #7
    Adam Lea
    Guest Adam Lea's Avatar

    Default Most remote place in Scotland

    I am thinking in geographical terms, not accessibility, just for
    curiosity. I sometimes recall when I was stood on the summit of Beinn
    Dearg* (the Forest of Atholl one) and for pretty much the whole panorama
    I couldn't see any sign of human habitation, it was like rolling
    moorland from horizon to horizon. That area between the A9 and A93 is a
    vast roadless area and I was wondering if there are other regions that
    are a long way from a public road.

    I am happy to extend the criteria to distance from any transportation
    link if you wish.

    Ben Alder is another good example of somewhere that requires a long walk
    in from a public road.

    *About the only place I've been in Scotland where I have felt really
    small and vulnerable.

  8. #8
    Adam Lea
    Guest Adam Lea's Avatar

    Default Most remote place in Scotland

    If you have a mountain bike, that automatically makes the remote places
    much more accessible, thanks to the network of estate roads along many
    of the otherwise roadless glens.

    Beinn Dearg (Atholl) was a bit like that, hire bike in Blair Atholl,
    cycle to bothy, walk to summit, walk back, cycle back to Blair Atholl. I
    think I managed the whole thing in under six hours.

    Similarly, the Southern Cairngorms are much easier to access with a
    mountain bike.

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