®




Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 43

Thread: What percentage of 20 year old cars are on the road?

  1. #11
    Mike Hunter
    Guest Mike Hunter's Avatar

    Default What percentage of 20 year old cars are on the road?

    What part of "OLD CARS shows," did you not understand, dummy? "Often
    contain OLD cars? Are you really that slow, that's all they show at
    OLD car shows and the fact is old Jap cars are a rarity. Is it any wonder
    we call you Joe$#itForBrains. LOL

    "Joe$#itForBrains" <newstrash@frontiernet.net> wrote in message
    news:%XGFm.12$qe6.4@newsfe14.iad...
    > What's to admit? That car shows happen and often contain old cars? That
    > doesn't change the fact that a handful of old cars are statistically
    > relevent.
    >
    > Sorry I used those big words. But it had to be done.
    >
    >
    >
    > "Mike Hunter" <Mikehunt2@lycos,com> wrote in message
    > news:4ae73a66$0$29602$ce5e7886@news-radius.ptd.net...
    >> You certainly are entitled to your own opinion, Joe$#itForBrains, no
    >> mater how convoluted it may be. At least you are admitting that what I
    >> posted is factual LOL
    >>
    >>
    >> "Joe$#itForBrains" <newstrash@frontiernet.net> wrote in message
    >> news:XkGFm.6$qe6.5@newsfe14.iad...
    >>> "Mike Hunter" <Mikehunt2@lycos,com> wrote in message
    >>> news:4ae72deb$0$18744$ce5e7886@news-radius.ptd.net...
    >>>> If one really wants to see who actually has the vehicles with the
    >>>> longer overall longevity, go to some of the old car shows. Seldom will
    >>>> one see any of the Japanese sedans at those shows.
    >>>>
    >>>> Plenty of domestics sedans and sporty cars, as well as English and
    >>>> European old cars, even Italian cars. Rarely will one see anything
    >>>> from Toyota or the other Japanese manufactures, except a rare RX7or "Z"
    >>>> car.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Car shows are not a valid source of the statistics necessary for
    >>> determining longevity. You either didn't take a stats course, or you
    >>> failed the course you took.
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >
    >

  2. #12
    JoeSpareBedroom
    Guest JoeSpareBedroom's Avatar

    Default What percentage of 20 year old cars are on the road?

    Pick any single model & year of old car you love. Now, tell us the largest
    number of that car you've ever seen at ONE CAR SHOW.

    Because you are drunk & senile, I'll give you an example of how to answer
    the question:

    "I love 1970 Mercury Cougars, and I've seen two at a single car show."

    Go.

    "Mike Hunter" <Mikehunt2@lycos,com> wrote in message
    news:4ae740b2$0$29572$ce5e7886@news-radius.ptd.net...
    > What part of "OLD CARS shows," did you not understand, dummy? "Often
    > contain OLD cars? Are you really that slow, that's all they show at
    > OLD car shows and the fact is old Jap cars are a rarity. Is it any
    > wonder we call you Joe$#itForBrains. LOL
    >
    >
    > "Joe$#itForBrains" <newstrash@frontiernet.net> wrote in message
    > news:%XGFm.12$qe6.4@newsfe14.iad...
    >> What's to admit? That car shows happen and often contain old cars? That
    >> doesn't change the fact that a handful of old cars are statistically
    >> relevent.
    >>
    >> Sorry I used those big words. But it had to be done.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "Mike Hunter" <Mikehunt2@lycos,com> wrote in message
    >> news:4ae73a66$0$29602$ce5e7886@news-radius.ptd.net...
    >>> You certainly are entitled to your own opinion, Joe$#itForBrains, no
    >>> mater how convoluted it may be. At least you are admitting that what
    >>> I posted is factual LOL
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Joe$#itForBrains" <newstrash@frontiernet.net> wrote in message
    >>> news:XkGFm.6$qe6.5@newsfe14.iad...
    >>>> "Mike Hunter" <Mikehunt2@lycos,com> wrote in message
    >>>> news:4ae72deb$0$18744$ce5e7886@news-radius.ptd.net...
    >>>>> If one really wants to see who actually has the vehicles with the
    >>>>> longer overall longevity, go to some of the old car shows. Seldom
    >>>>> will one see any of the Japanese sedans at those shows.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Plenty of domestics sedans and sporty cars, as well as English and
    >>>>> European old cars, even Italian cars. Rarely will one see anything
    >>>>> from Toyota or the other Japanese manufactures, except a rare RX7or
    >>>>> "Z" car.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Car shows are not a valid source of the statistics necessary for
    >>>> determining longevity. You either didn't take a stats course, or you
    >>>> failed the course you took.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >
    >

  3. #13
    dr_jeff
    Guest dr_jeff's Avatar

    Default What percentage of 20 year old cars are on the road?

    Mike Hunter wrote:
    > Most Toyota ads are somewhat deceptive and some are even bogus. Remember
    > when the Tundra first was introduced? Toyota made a lot of claims that led
    > some to believe it had things other full size trucks did not have. The
    > fact was Toyota was finally offering a truck that was closer to the standers
    > of domestic brands. Then of course there was always the bogus, made in
    > America claim, when it has always only been assembled in the US, of mostly
    > parts and materials that were not from the US but from Canada and Japan.


    It has a similar domestic (Canadian and US) content as the other
    American trucks (only the F-150 has a higher domestic content). What
    evidence do have that there is less US content?

    Jeff

    > "C. E. White" <cewhite3@remove...............> wrote in message
    > news:4ae70c7c$1@kcnews01...
    >> A Toyota commercial they are running in my area claims that 80% of all
    >> Toyota sold in the last 20 years are still on the road. This seemed to be a
    >> very low number to me. What do other think?
    >>
    >> I would have thought given Toyota's increase in sales over the last twenty
    >> years they would have had more like 90% of the cars sold in the last 20
    >> years still on the road. Toyota sales have been increasing over the last
    >> twenty years, so a higher percentage of Toyotas will be newer models.
    >> Since a high percentage of Toyotas are newer vehicles that are more likely
    >> to still be on the road, the overall percentage of Toyotas sold in the
    >> last 20 years will be higher (becasue of the newer car bias). For GM, the
    >> math works the other way. GM sales have been stagnent or actually
    >> declining over the last 20 years, so a higher percentage of their cars
    >> will be older and therefore less likely to still be on the road. I am sure
    >> the 80% number is based on registrations, so it might be that it over
    >> estimates the number actually in daily use - or under estimates it in
    >> cases where cars are used off road (or illeagally) and not registered.
    >>
    >> Does anyone have any actual numbers? I am confident that 100% of the NEW
    >> vehicles I purchased in the last 20 years are still on the road, but maybe
    >> I am an exception.
    >>
    >> Here is sort of what I am thinking....NOT REAL NUMBERS -
    >>
    >> For a manufacturer with increasing sales (5% increase per year)
    >>
    >> Year Original Percent Total
    >> Sold Sales On road On Road
    >> 1990 500000 33% 165000
    >> 1991 525000 38% 199500
    >> 1992 551250 43% 237038
    >> 1993 578813 48% 277830
    >> 1994 607753 53% 322109
    >> 1995 638141 58% 370122
    >> 1996 670048 63% 422130
    >> 1997 703550 68% 478414
    >> 1998 738728 72% 531884
    >> 1999 775664 76% 589505
    >> 2000 814447 80% 651558
    >> 2001 855170 84% 718343
    >> 2002 897928 88% 790177
    >> 2003 942825 91% 857970
    >> 2004 989966 93% 920668
    >> 2005 1039464 96% 997886
    >> 2006 1091437 97% 1058694
    >> 2007 1146009 98% 1123089
    >> 2008 1203310 99% 1191277
    >> 2009 1263475 99% 1250840
    >> Total 16532977 80% 13154033
    >>
    >> For a manufacturer with slightly decreasing sales (1% decrease per year),
    >> but same percent still on the road:
    >>
    >> 1990 1263475 33% 416947
    >> 1991 1250840 38% 475319
    >> 1992 1238332 43% 532483
    >> 1993 1225949 48% 588455
    >> 1994 1213689 53% 643255
    >> 1995 1201552 58% 696900
    >> 1996 1189537 63% 749408
    >> 1997 1177641 68% 800796
    >> 1998 1165865 72% 839423
    >> 1999 1154206 76% 877197
    >> 2000 1142664 80% 914131
    >> 2001 1131238 84% 950240
    >> 2002 1119925 88% 985534
    >> 2003 1108726 91% 1008941
    >> 2004 1097639 93% 1020804
    >> 2005 1086662 96% 1043196
    >> 2006 1075796 97% 1043522
    >> 2007 1065038 98% 1043737
    >> 2008 1054387 99% 1043843
    >> 2009 1043843 99% 1033405
    >> Total 23007003 73% 16707535
    >>
    >> The net is, manufacturers that have similar reliability can have
    >> significantly different percentages of vehicles built in the last 20 years
    >> still on the road. Ergo, the Toyota's ad claim is at best meaningless, at
    >> worst deliberately misleading....but then I've always assumed that the
    >> Chevy (or sometimes Dodge) ads that clam their trucks are the most
    >> reliable and longest lasting (based on registration data) are deliberately
    >> misleading. So, I don't think Toyota is being espeically misleading, but I
    >> wonder how many people understand the ad? I'll bet many people think
    >> Toyota is saying 80% of 20 year old Toyotas are still on the road, instead
    >> of 80% of the Toyotas sold in the last twenty years....isn't marketing
    >> wonderful. There is a huge difference in the two statements.
    >>
    >> Ed
    >>

    >
    >

  4. #14
    Tegger
    Guest Tegger's Avatar

    Default What percentage of 20 year old cars are on the road?

    clare@snyder.on.ca wrote in
    news:ukiee517m0l7ll2rc32vbev430hrrep7v1@........:

    > On Tue, 27 Oct 2009 16:33:54 +0000 (UTC), Tegger <invalid@invalid.inv>
    > wrote:
    >


    >>
    >>I infrequently see cars (of any make) older than about 1992. Cars
    >>older than about 1989 are almost non-existent around here.

    >
    >
    > You need to read the claim.
    > 80% of vehicles sold over the last 20 years are still on the road.
    > This could be true even if NO 20 year old Toyotas were still on the
    > road. There are still a significant number of 1989 Toyotas on the
    > road, particularly in the south, and California (where the majority
    > were sold in the beginning)
    >


    That's why I said "unless that missing 20% is all concentrated up here
    [in the Rust Belt]". Sure, it's possible Toyota's figures are accurate if
    you include the dry southwest. Cars stay rust-free for a /long/ time down
    there.

    Informal survey by myself today:
    Mileage covered: about 100
    Number of cars observed: thousands, I'm sure
    Number of cars obviously over 20 years in age: one (~'85 Olds Cutlass)
    Number of cars that were older than 1993: maybe 20

    I would say that the overwhelming bulk of the cars I saw today were between
    five and ten years old.

    --
    Tegger

  5. #15
    Tegger
    Guest Tegger's Avatar

    Default What percentage of 20 year old cars are on the road?

    Vic Smith <thismailautodeleted@............> wrote in
    news:84qee5tebrut4t6l2eka5roni4umotj2f0@........:

    > On Tue, 27 Oct 2009 11:05:48 -0700 (PDT), m6onz5a
    > <corvair@............> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>
    >>All of those old cars must be hiding somewhere because I hardly ever
    >>see any old ones on the road.

    >
    > That's another problem with getting "real" and useful meaning from
    > registration figures.
    > Where I live in the burbs there's hardly any old cars. My '90 Corsica
    > might be the oldest car of the closest 200 cars around here.
    > I just use it for local trips, and wouldn't take it on the road.
    > But if I go about 10 miles into the north side of Chicago, I can see
    > all sorts of such cars parked on the streets.


    Exactly the point I just made in another reply. Being registered for the
    road does not correlate with actual use.


    > Instead of 1 in 200, it's more like 1 in 10.
    > I assume that most are used like mine, and not real "highway cars."
    > But where you're at can make a huge difference in the age of cars you
    > see around you.


    Yep.

    My '91 Integra, still very much a daily driver (with 332,000 miles on it),
    is often the oldest car around, wherever I am.

    --
    Tegger

  6. #16
    JoeSpareBedroom
    Guest JoeSpareBedroom's Avatar

    Default What percentage of 20 year old cars are on the road?

    "Vic Smith" <thismailautodeleted@............> wrote in message
    news:rsree5hqibu7cf8qjo4icvibbue2oeb9g0@...........
    > On Tue, 27 Oct 2009 18:07:09 -0400, "JoeSpareBedroom"
    > <newstrash@frontiernet.net> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>
    >>I never said people did not buy trucks for different purposes. Rather, Mr.
    >>White claimed that certain types of people bought particular brands as
    >>"fun
    >>trucks", and other brands as "work trucks". Example (paraphrasing):
    >>"Nobody
    >>buys Tundras as work trucks." I've explained that I've never seen actual
    >>data to back this up, and as far as I know, neither has anyone else, ever.
    >>

    > Didn't see that. You sensitive about Tundra because it's a Toyota?
    >
    >>I'd like to be proven wrong, but not using anecdotes.
    >>

    > I'll try to remember to ask my kid about that. He works on all kinds
    > of truck suspensions all day, every day.
    > Don't know if he sees many Tundras though. Some of that stuff is
    > regional.
    > But he has no "prejudice" among brands. Though he's a solid GM car
    > fan, he digs the Ford trucks. For professional reasons.
    > But what you'll get from all his experience will be an anecdote.
    >
    > --Vic


    ....and a very small sample.

    It would be great if state motor vehicle departments would add a little
    questionaire to their forms. "How will you use this truck?"

    1) Family transportation
    2) Towing a sport vehicle or boat
    3) Farming
    4) Building trades

    That sorta thing. Just because they could do it.

  7. #17
    Tegger
    Guest Tegger's Avatar

    Default What percentage of 20 year old cars are on the road?

    kludge@panix.com (Scott Dorsey) wrote in
    news:hc86r2$e3h$1@panix2.panix.com:

    > Tegger <invalid@invalid.inv> wrote:
    >>
    >>My '91 Integra, still very much a daily driver (with 332,000 miles on
    >>it), is often the oldest car around, wherever I am.

    >
    >
    > This morning I parked my '74 next to a Desoto and a '54 MG at work.
    > And I work for an outfit that's supposed to be doing state of the art
    > technology, too.
    >
    > The guy with the Model A wasn't there, though. He took the Maverick
    > in.
    >


    You work in a very unusual place, I must say. Does your company hire only
    one-upmans?

    --
    Tegger

  8. #18
    nm5k
    Guest nm5k's Avatar

    Default What percentage of 20 year old cars are on the road?

    On Oct 27, 6:06.pm, Vic Smith <thismailautodele...@............> wrote:

    >
    > Maybe. .But I'd listen to him if I were buying a work truck.
    > It would be a Ford.


    It's fairly well known that Fords are a bit tougher in general.
    The older ones in particular. The 1/2 tons even more particular,
    as the Chevy half tons have a suspension that is not much
    different than a large car. Where as the Fords used twin I
    beams.
    I've had plenty of both makes, and for work, I would say the
    Ford hands down. Not to say the Chevy can't work, but they
    won't take the brutal abuse the Fords will.
    It may be anecdotal, but I've always preferred Chevy's for
    street trucks, and Fords for work trucks.

    I still have two Fords at this time. A 68 F-250, and a 74 F-100.
    Both run great and I wouldn't be afraid to drive either one anywhere.
    Both have six bangers, "300 in the 68, and a 240 in the 74",
    both have manual's, and both are so simple and rugged that
    you have to be really mean on a vehicle to kill one of them.
    Wonder how many 40+ year old cars are still on the road,
    and pretty much driven regularly... My 68 F-250 is one of them.
    Course like any vehicle, upkeep has to be done.
    I'm not saying the engine hasn't been rebuilt and the front end
    is original.. I put a new long block in it in about 2002, and
    totally rebuilt the front end, including king pins in about 2004.
    But for a 41 year old truck, it runs good and is totally reliable
    So easy to work on too. You can actually climb in under the
    hood of mine to be next to the engine. :/
    Parts changes are a breeze. I can rebuild Carter 1 barrels in less
    than an hour.
    The 68 with the granny gear 4 speed would probably rip
    trees out of the ground with the low RPM torque the 300
    has. I know it would drag my Corolla down the street kicking
    and screaming the whole way if they were connected by chains.

    But my favorite street trucks I've had were both Chevy's,
    and both had 250 sixes.. A 66, and a 72. Both were step
    sides. I had Blazer buckets and console in the 72. Good
    street trucks.. The 66 was a step with the small back window.
    It's older 250 had more guts than the semi smog version in the
    72..
    The heaviest duty Chevy truck I had was a 78 3/4 ton. It was
    fairly stout as far as Chevy's go. But the front end wasn't quite
    as stout as the twin I beams on a older 3/4 ton Ford.

  9. #19
    Mike Hunter
    Guest Mike Hunter's Avatar

    Default What percentage of 20 year old cars are on the road?

    Obviously you are not aware of fleet courier cars. They are compact cars
    bought mostly from the domestics and the Koreans. They are run almost
    twenty four hours and day and generally six and even seven days a week.
    100,000,000 annually is not uncommon.

    "dr_jeff" <utz@msu.edu> wrote in message news:4AE85441.9060008@msu.edu...
    > The numbers are misleading, however. You can have a Lexus that has 200,000
    > mi going strong after 20 years, and a Ford Focus that has been worn out
    > after 500,000 after 3 years.
    >
    > SMS wrote:
    >> C. E. White wrote:
    >>> A Toyota commercial they are running in my area claims that 80% of all
    >>> Toyota sold in the last 20 years are still on the road. This seemed to
    >>> be a very low number to me. What do other think?

    >>

  10. #20
    SMS
    Guest SMS's Avatar

    Default What percentage of 20 year old cars are on the road?

    dr_jeff wrote:
    > The numbers are misleading, however. You can have a Lexus that has
    > 200,000 mi going strong after 20 years, and a Ford Focus that has been
    > worn out after 500,000 after 3 years.


    And the reverse could also be true. There are always outliers, but of
    all the possible reasons for the results, the one you gave is probably
    the least likely to affect the results.

    Remove the luxury makes, the niche brands, and the makes that were not
    in existence for the full 20 years, and the brands that were the most
    likely to be on the road for 11-20 years are:

    1. Toyota
    2. Honda
    3. Mazda
    4. Buick
    5. VW
    6. Buick
    7. Chrysler (or is this a luxury brand?)
    8. Nissan

    The top two are very consistent with what you see on the road, at least
    in the state I live in. Tons of older Hondas and Toyotas, VWs, and Nissans.

    What the survey doesn't take into account is the demographics of the
    owners. Someone that purchases a Toyota or Honda is more likely to be
    more highly educated and higher income, and will maintain their vehicles
    better and will be less likely to drive in a way that will total the
    vehicle, than the purchaser of many of the makes that did poorly in
    longevity.

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •