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Thread: 2003 Ford Expedition Radio

  1. #1
    Riverside Farms
    Guest Riverside Farms's Avatar

    Default 2003 Ford Expedition Radio

    Help!
    My 2003 Expedition has the stock/factory installed radio in it with the 6cd
    changer. I am able to play commercially recorded cd's just fine but when I
    try to play a cd that I have recorded with either music or talk on it, the
    radio won't read the cd. Does anyone know what format I should be saving the
    files onto the cd in so the radio can "find them"?
    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Spdloader
    Guest Spdloader's Avatar

    Default 2003 Ford Expedition Radio

    It'll read a .wmv, (I don't know what else) but also be sure you're using a
    CD-R and not a CDRW.

    Spdloader

    "Riverside Farms" <u20372@uwe> wrote in message news:5e23607a58995@uwe...
    > Help!
    > My 2003 Expedition has the stock/factory installed radio in it with the
    > 6cd
    > changer. I am able to play commercially recorded cd's just fine but when
    > I
    > try to play a cd that I have recorded with either music or talk on it, the
    > radio won't read the cd. Does anyone know what format I should be saving
    > the
    > files onto the cd in so the radio can "find them"?
    > Thanks!

  3. #3
    Riverside Farms
    Guest Riverside Farms's Avatar

    Default 2003 Ford Expedition Radio

    So if I try and use the rewritable cd's they won't work with any format saved
    to them?

    Spdloader wrote:
    >It'll read a .wmv, (I don't know what else) but also be sure you're using a
    >CD-R and not a CDRW.
    >
    >Spdloader
    >
    >> Help!
    >> My 2003 Expedition has the stock/factory installed radio in it with the

    >[quoted text clipped - 6 lines]
    >> files onto the cd in so the radio can "find them"?
    >> Thanks!

  4. #4
    Spdloader
    Guest Spdloader's Avatar

    Default 2003 Ford Expedition Radio

    To the best of my knowledge, the rewriteables don't work in anything except
    other computers. Regardless of the format.

    CD-R only in a vehicles stereo system, DVD-R in the onboard DVD player, if
    you have one of those.

    Spdloader

    "Riverside Farms" <u20372@uwe> wrote in message news:5e2416128a8f2@uwe...
    > So if I try and use the rewritable cd's they won't work with any format
    > saved
    > to them?
    >
    > Spdloader wrote:
    >>It'll read a .wmv, (I don't know what else) but also be sure you're using
    >>a
    >>CD-R and not a CDRW.
    >>
    >>Spdloader
    >>
    >>> Help!
    >>> My 2003 Expedition has the stock/factory installed radio in it with the

    >>[quoted text clipped - 6 lines]
    >>> files onto the cd in so the radio can "find them"?
    >>> Thanks!

  5. #5
    mike
    Guest mike's Avatar

    Default 2003 Ford Expedition Radio

    I know this might sound dumb but just make shore your burning them like
    a "audio CD" and not burning a "data disc" to make shore you you get
    the formatting right some newer players will play data discs but most
    older ones probably won't

    there really isn't a difference between "data discs" and "audio CD" the
    only difference is the way the way the files are put on the disc.

    I have nero burning ROM and for best compatiblity would burn a CD Audio
    disc which should work in almost any player unless the discs give you
    trouble i've burned plenty of discs and used them in CD players from
    the early 90s. that back when the CD player
    was a new thing!

    hope that helps
    mike

  6. #6
    Spdloader
    Guest Spdloader's Avatar

    Default 2003 Ford Expedition Radio

    Not boring at all.
    Couple of questions.
    Are CDRW discs physically thicker than CDRW? The ones I buy sure seem to be.

    I noticed (when digging stuck CDs out of Ford stereos for people) most every
    one was either a CDRW, or, a CD-R with a label (stick on type) on it.

    I wondered if thickness played a role.

    Spdloader

    "CJB" <colonyparkwagon@excite.com> wrote in message
    news:iMcYf.7821$qe7.1429@trnddc04...
    "Riverside Farms" <u20372@uwe> wrote in message news:5e23607a58995@uwe...
    > Help!
    > My 2003 Expedition has the stock/factory installed radio in it with the
    > 6cd
    > changer. I am able to play commercially recorded cd's just fine but when
    > I
    > try to play a cd that I have recorded with either music or talk on it, the
    > radio won't read the cd. Does anyone know what format I should be saving
    > the
    > files onto the cd in so the radio can "find them"?
    > Thanks!


    I'm going to write one post to sort of combine the comments and questions
    I've seen in this thread. I hope this helps all of you. My background is
    this: I am a former contract engineer for a radio broadcast group. Now, I
    work for our church to produce a syndicated radio broadcast that's heard on
    40 some stations around the country and, by shortwave and internet, around
    the world. Weekly I produce about 50 cds of 4 different recordings. I've
    been working around this stuff for a long time.

    The original problems of compatibility between cd burners and cd players
    were caused mostly by a weak laser strength. That's why in the earlier days
    of home cd burning, i.e. the mid-late 90's, even the color of the media that
    the CD-R was made of made a difference as to whether or not your player
    could read it. As the technology evolved, lasers got stronger and stronger.
    Now, players will play just about every CD you put in them, so long as the
    CD is recorded in the right file format.

    Now, the problems of compatiblity are more likely caused by file format
    issues. CD players were originally designed to play files recorded to a
    very specific file type standardized as what is called the "Red Book
    Standard" Older players, and cheaper players, will only play files that are
    compatible with that standard. Only in the last few years have you seen
    players that can play .mp3 files or .wma files. Those types of files are
    technically "data" files; they have been "encoded" by a different standard.
    MP3, or MPEG Layer 3 , files are highly compressed files that are recorded
    with a software "codec" and requires software to decode it. The compression
    algorithm was developed by the Motion Picture Experts Group.

    The same type of situation exists with .wma files. WMA, which stands for
    Windows Media Audio, is a proprietary compression algorithm designed by
    Microsoft. It requires yet another software codec to decode. If your CD
    player does not have the software to decode .mp3, .wma, or .aac (Apple's
    proprietary compression algorithm), it will not be able to play those types
    of files.

    The advantage of these various compression algorithms is that the files take
    up MUCH less storage than "uncompressed" CD standard audio. A CD usually
    will hold 700MB, and will hold 80 minutes of uncompressed audio at 44100
    bits/second, 16bits/sample Stereo audio (the CD standard). The various
    compression methods will allow you to compress the file sizes dramatically.
    The average listener won't much notice a difference in audio quality if you
    use a ratio of something like 5:1. That means that you could hold 400
    minutes of audio on that one CD instead of 80, and not notice much
    difference. A lot of people use compression ratios of more like 12:1, which
    would give you 960 minutes of audio on an "80 minute" cd. That's why people
    use those types of files, although the more you compress a file, the worse
    it sounds.

    The latest addition to this phenomenon is that people are using DVDs to hold
    audio files. A single layer DVD will hold 4.7 Gigabites. That's nearly 7
    times the capacity of a CD. Dual layer DVDs hold 8.5 GB, which is over 12
    times the capacity of CDs. Some "CD" players now will play audio recorded
    to DVD using one of those aforementioned compression algorithms. One of
    these days, someone will post to usenet to ask why their "cd" player won't
    play their DVD.

    With that background information, if you have a problem with a particular
    player playing a CD, it could be due to several causes. First, it may be
    that the file format you're recording to, i.e. .mp3, .aac, .wma, is not
    supported by your cd player. Second, it may be that you're using an old cd
    burner with old software and it's either not burning it well enough or it's
    not really burning to the Red Book standard. Third, it may be that you're
    burning a multi-session disk, and not finalizing it. There are other
    possible problems, but I'd think you're looking at one of those.

    Sorry if I bored you all...

    CJB

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