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Thread: Chrysler 300M still clunks

  1. #1
    Art
    Guest Art's Avatar

    Default Chrysler 300M still clunks

    So I've been trying to get the clunks out of my 300M for months now so I can
    give the car to my in-laws. First under the extended warranty. Now its on
    my nickel. Front struts were replaced. So was steering rack and some other
    odd pieces. At that point clunks became unpredictably intermittent and no
    amount of jostling the car or moving things underneath could duplicate them.
    On my nickel the bottom half of the steering column was replaced and the
    front struts were replaced again along with the bearing plates they sit on.
    Now the clunk is even rarer but still happens. The annoying thing about it
    is each time I remind the dealer not to overtighten the screws for the wiper
    trim but they always ruin the plastic blocks they screw into. Also each
    time the steering wheel is crooked when I pick up the car. I just left them
    the car to fix those 2 issues again. I will be giving up on the clunk and
    with the purchase of 2 Honda's, that will be it for Chrysler for a while.

  2. #2
    Bill Putney
    Guest Bill Putney's Avatar

    Default Chrysler 300M still clunks

    > If it's end links, they are about $70 per side and they, too, can be
    > replaced with simple handtools. The only unique too you might need would be
    > a joint seperator to pop the ends loose.


    You can find the OEM TRW brand ones in aftermarket for under $40. No
    separator needed - not a taepred joint - just remove the nuts and they
    come right out.

    I would have suggested this too, but Art was very insistent that the
    problem could not be duplicated - only occurred once in a blue moon or
    something like that. Usually the sway bar bushing/end link problem is
    easily duplicated.

    Bill Putney
    (To reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my
    address with the letter 'x')

  3. #3
    Bill Putney
    Guest Bill Putney's Avatar

    Default Chrysler 300M still clunks

    > If it were those bushings, would it explain a clunk that happens only once
    > or twice in a 20 mile drive despite numerous stop and goes and turns, and
    > with no regularity whatsoever?


    A very easy way to prove once and for all if it's either the sway bar
    bushings or end links is to completely remove one end link. If the
    noise doesn't recur with that off, then the problem is the sway bar
    bushings and/or end links. If the noise still recurs (how ever often
    you're experiencing it) with the end link removed, then the problem is
    elsewhere. Driving without the end link installed just means the sway
    bar will not be doing anything - no risk of damage or a safety concern
    driving with the end link removed.

    Bill Putney
    (To reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my
    address with the letter 'x')

  4. #4
    Bill Putney
    Guest Bill Putney's Avatar

    Default Chrysler 300M still clunks

    > Art,
    >
    > I'm not at all surprised. The bushings cannot, I repeat, cannot be
    > diagnosed by looking at them on a rack.


    However, as I pointed out earlier, you can rule sway bar bushings and
    end links in or out as the cause with 100% certainty by simply removing
    one end link from the vehicle (i.e., totally unloading the sway bar) and
    seeing if the noise stays or goes away when you drive it.

    If the noise does not occur with the one end link removed, then that
    proves that one or more bushings and or end links are bad. If the noise
    still happens with the end link removed, then the noise is elsewhere.

    And yes - to pay a shop to do that experiment is just going to add to
    the total cost of getting to a solution - unless it proves that the
    bushings/end links are the problem, and it might be a good idea at that
    point to have them just replace them (except, again, paying a shop to do
    it with their greatly inflated parts costs is liable to cost an
    additional couple of hundred dollars instead of the well-under-$100 and
    1 or 2 hours that it would cost to DIY).

    If it solves the problem, then it will have been worth it. If it
    doesn't, you still have the problem, but you at least have ruled those
    parts out.

    Bill Putney
    (To reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my
    address with the letter 'x')

  5. #5
    Art
    Guest Art's Avatar

    Default Chrysler 300M still clunks

    There was a time that I used to do this stuff myself but I kind of gave that
    up. I also used to have a riding lawn mower. I pay a lawn service now.
    Just a question of priorities as you age.

    "Bill Putney" <bptn@kinez.net> wrote in message
    news:dslc6k$m5a$1@news.isdn.net...
    > RCSnyder wrote:
    >> Art,
    >>
    >> I'm not at all surprised. The bushings cannot, I repeat, cannot be
    >> diagnosed by looking at them on a rack.

    >
    > However, as I pointed out earlier, you can rule sway bar bushings and end
    > links in or out as the cause with 100% certainty by simply removing one
    > end link from the vehicle (i.e., totally unloading the sway bar) and
    > seeing if the noise stays or goes away when you drive it.
    >
    > If the noise does not occur with the one end link removed, then that
    > proves that one or more bushings and or end links are bad. If the noise
    > still happens with the end link removed, then the noise is elsewhere.
    >
    > And yes - to pay a shop to do that experiment is just going to add to the
    > total cost of getting to a solution - unless it proves that the
    > bushings/end links are the problem, and it might be a good idea at that
    > point to have them just replace them (except, again, paying a shop to do
    > it with their greatly inflated parts costs is liable to cost an additional
    > couple of hundred dollars instead of the well-under-$100 and 1 or 2 hours
    > that it would cost to DIY).
    >
    > If it solves the problem, then it will have been worth it. If it doesn't,
    > you still have the problem, but you at least have ruled those parts out.
    >
    > Bill Putney
    > (To reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my address
    > with the letter 'x')

  6. #6
    philthy
    Guest philthy's Avatar

    Default Chrysler 300M still clunks

    that particular app. would actually cause the sway bar to klunk more
    hitting other stuff while it was disconnected
    u did hit the nail on the head was the owner willing to pay for the time
    spent on the vehicle?

    Bill Putney wrote:

    > RCSnyder wrote:
    > > Art,
    > >
    > > I'm not at all surprised. The bushings cannot, I repeat, cannot be
    > > diagnosed by looking at them on a rack.

    >
    > However, as I pointed out earlier, you can rule sway bar bushings and
    > end links in or out as the cause with 100% certainty by simply removing
    > one end link from the vehicle (i.e., totally unloading the sway bar) and
    > seeing if the noise stays or goes away when you drive it.
    >
    > If the noise does not occur with the one end link removed, then that
    > proves that one or more bushings and or end links are bad. If the noise
    > still happens with the end link removed, then the noise is elsewhere.
    >
    > And yes - to pay a shop to do that experiment is just going to add to
    > the total cost of getting to a solution - unless it proves that the
    > bushings/end links are the problem, and it might be a good idea at that
    > point to have them just replace them (except, again, paying a shop to do
    > it with their greatly inflated parts costs is liable to cost an
    > additional couple of hundred dollars instead of the well-under-$100 and
    > 1 or 2 hours that it would cost to DIY).
    >
    > If it solves the problem, then it will have been worth it. If it
    > doesn't, you still have the problem, but you at least have ruled those
    > parts out.
    >
    > Bill Putney
    > (To reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my
    > address with the letter 'x')

  7. #7
    Art
    Guest Art's Avatar

    Default Chrysler 300M still clunks

    > that particular app. would actually cause the sway bar to klunk more
    > hitting other stuff while it was disconnected
    > u did hit the nail on the head was the owner willing to pay for the time
    > spent on the vehicle?


    I spent about $900 at Chrysler and I told the Dodge dealer I will cover
    diagnosis time. If I was keeping the car, I would just be driving it until
    the clunk got bad enuf to be easy to diagnose but we are giving it to my
    in-laws, hopefully troube free.


    >
    > Bill Putney wrote:
    >
    >> RCSnyder wrote:
    >> > Art,
    >> >
    >> > I'm not at all surprised. The bushings cannot, I repeat, cannot be
    >> > diagnosed by looking at them on a rack.

    >>
    >> However, as I pointed out earlier, you can rule sway bar bushings and
    >> end links in or out as the cause with 100% certainty by simply removing
    >> one end link from the vehicle (i.e., totally unloading the sway bar) and
    >> seeing if the noise stays or goes away when you drive it.
    >>
    >> If the noise does not occur with the one end link removed, then that
    >> proves that one or more bushings and or end links are bad. If the noise
    >> still happens with the end link removed, then the noise is elsewhere.
    >>
    >> And yes - to pay a shop to do that experiment is just going to add to
    >> the total cost of getting to a solution - unless it proves that the
    >> bushings/end links are the problem, and it might be a good idea at that
    >> point to have them just replace them (except, again, paying a shop to do
    >> it with their greatly inflated parts costs is liable to cost an
    >> additional couple of hundred dollars instead of the well-under-$100 and
    >> 1 or 2 hours that it would cost to DIY).
    >>
    >> If it solves the problem, then it will have been worth it. If it
    >> doesn't, you still have the problem, but you at least have ruled those
    >> parts out.
    >>
    >> Bill Putney
    >> (To reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my
    >> address with the letter 'x')

    >

  8. #8
    Bill Putney
    Guest Bill Putney's Avatar

    Default Chrysler 300M still clunks

    You don't know what your talking about - you abviously haven't tried it
    (and if you were uncertain about it, it was probably a good idea not
    to). Absolutely nothing hits anything. It's a completely valid test
    for an LH car.

    Bill Putney
    (To reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my
    address with the letter 'x')

    philthy wrote:

    > that particular app. would actually cause the sway bar to klunk more
    > hitting other stuff while it was disconnected
    > u did hit the nail on the head was the owner willing to pay for the time
    > spent on the vehicle?
    >
    > Bill Putney wrote:
    >
    >
    >>RCSnyder wrote:
    >>
    >>>Art,
    >>>
    >>>I'm not at all surprised. The bushings cannot, I repeat, cannot be
    >>>diagnosed by looking at them on a rack.

    >>
    >>However, as I pointed out earlier, you can rule sway bar bushings and
    >>end links in or out as the cause with 100% certainty by simply removing
    >>one end link from the vehicle (i.e., totally unloading the sway bar) and
    >>seeing if the noise stays or goes away when you drive it.
    >>
    >>If the noise does not occur with the one end link removed, then that
    >>proves that one or more bushings and or end links are bad. If the noise
    >>still happens with the end link removed, then the noise is elsewhere.
    >>
    >>And yes - to pay a shop to do that experiment is just going to add to
    >>the total cost of getting to a solution - unless it proves that the
    >>bushings/end links are the problem, and it might be a good idea at that
    >>point to have them just replace them (except, again, paying a shop to do
    >>it with their greatly inflated parts costs is liable to cost an
    >>additional couple of hundred dollars instead of the well-under-$100 and
    >>1 or 2 hours that it would cost to DIY).
    >>
    >>If it solves the problem, then it will have been worth it. If it
    >>doesn't, you still have the problem, but you at least have ruled those
    >>parts out.
    >>
    >>Bill Putney
    >>(To reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my
    >>address with the letter 'x')

    >
    >

  9. #9
    Daniel J. Stern
    Guest Daniel J. Stern's Avatar

    Default Chrysler 300M still clunks

    > You don't know what your talking about

    Welcome to Philthy's world!

  10. #10
    Steve
    Guest Steve's Avatar

    Default Chrysler 300M still clunks

    > The Dodge dealer is trying to show up the Chrysler dealer 2 blocks away. I
    > think they are really trying to solver the problem.
    >


    Have you considered that it may not be a "clunk" at all, but more of a
    "pop" caused by rubber bushings adhering to the stabilizer bar and then
    popping loose? I've had that happen a whole lot, more often with
    polyeurethane bushings than rubber, but rubber isn't immune. Squirting
    silicone lubricant or "graphite" powder lubricant (which is usually
    molybdenum disulfide, not real graphite) into the area where the bushing
    clamps around the bar usually stops it... at least for a while.

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