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Thread: Correct Tire Pressure?

  1. #1
    no way
    Guest no way's Avatar

    Default Correct Tire Pressure?

    If the tires are wearing fine with 31 lbs, put them back to 31. The
    oppisite is true, air pressure to low, (25 or under), will cause a
    blow out. You would be surprised at the how much air you can put in a
    tire before it blows. Air pressure to high will cause the center of
    the tire tread to wear faster. Air pressure to low will cause both
    outer edges of a tire tread to wear faster.

  2. #2
    gpsman
    Guest gpsman's Avatar

    Default Correct Tire Pressure?

    On Apr 18, 12:38.pm, Robert11 <rgsr...@............> wrote:
    >
    > Tech Support at Nokian says to use what is on the car door sticker.
    > They would not suggest any p which is a bit surprising as I thought
    > the 'correct' pressure was probably
    > more specific tire type determined, than what Buick would suggest.


    Tire size and recommended pressures are spec'd by vehicle
    manufacturers.

    > 38 psi sounds
    > quite high (to me). .Is it ?


    No, it's a little on the high side, shouldn't be a problem for a
    reasonable motorist.
    --

    - gpsman

  3. #3
    AJL
    Guest AJL's Avatar

    Default Correct Tire Pressure?

    On Wed, 18 Apr 2012 09:38:17 -0700 (PDT), Robert11
    <rgsrose@............> wrote:

    >Have a 2009 Buick LaCrosse.


    >Car sticker says to set at 30 psi


    My 2004 Buick Century (bought new) also says to set it at 30 psi all
    around. That seemed a little low to me too. I have compromised at 32
    psi all these years. Probably my imagination but it seems to make the
    ride a bit harder. Perhaps Buick specifies 30 psi to give this low end
    Buick a softer ride? It currently has 22K miles on it (don't use it
    much) and the tires still look new, no noticeable wear patterns. Now I
    have to decide when to replace them because of old age (now 8 years
    old). I've read different opinions on the matter but the consensus
    seems to be 10 years. Opinions here?

  4. #4
    gregz
    Guest gregz's Avatar

    Default Correct Tire Pressure?

    AJL <13wim55@pleasenomail.com> wrote:
    > On Wed, 18 Apr 2012 09:38:17 -0700 (PDT), Robert11
    > <rgsrose@............> wrote:
    >
    >> Have a 2009 Buick LaCrosse.

    >
    >> Car sticker says to set at 30 psi

    >
    > My 2004 Buick Century (bought new) also says to set it at 30 psi all
    > around. That seemed a little low to me too. I have compromised at 32
    > psi all these years. Probably my imagination but it seems to make the
    > ride a bit harder. Perhaps Buick specifies 30 psi to give this low end
    > Buick a softer ride? It currently has 22K miles on it (don't use it
    > much) and the tires still look new, no noticeable wear patterns. Now I
    > have to decide when to replace them because of old age (now 8 years
    > old). I've read different opinions on the matter but the consensus
    > seems to be 10 years. Opinions here?


    I never got that much milage from tires. If kept indoors, they should be
    good. I had one set on a car for longer, but you could start to feel the
    dryness, and some cracking. Cracking occurred with me on a set of
    performance michelins in less than two years. Did a lot of armor all, which
    I suspect was the major reason, aside from being in the outdoors, in the
    desert. I think you have to worry about the inner layers which you can't
    see.

    Greg

  5. #5
    gregz
    Guest gregz's Avatar

    Default Correct Tire Pressure?

    gregz <zekor@............> wrote:
    > AJL <13wim55@pleasenomail.com> wrote:
    >> On Wed, 18 Apr 2012 09:38:17 -0700 (PDT), Robert11
    >> <rgsrose@............> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Have a 2009 Buick LaCrosse.

    >>
    >>> Car sticker says to set at 30 psi

    >>
    >> My 2004 Buick Century (bought new) also says to set it at 30 psi all
    >> around. That seemed a little low to me too. I have compromised at 32
    >> psi all these years. Probably my imagination but it seems to make the
    >> ride a bit harder. Perhaps Buick specifies 30 psi to give this low end
    >> Buick a softer ride? It currently has 22K miles on it (don't use it
    >> much) and the tires still look new, no noticeable wear patterns. Now I
    >> have to decide when to replace them because of old age (now 8 years
    >> old). I've read different opinions on the matter but the consensus
    >> seems to be 10 years. Opinions here?

    >
    > I never got that much milage from tires. If kept indoors, they should be
    > good. I had one set on a car for longer, but you could start to feel the
    > dryness, and some cracking. Cracking occurred with me on a set of
    > performance michelins in less than two years. Did a lot of armor all, which
    > I suspect was the major reason, aside from being in the outdoors, in the
    > desert. I think you have to worry about the inner layers which you can't
    > see.
    >
    > Greg


    I see those same michelins on ferraris, resurrected from storage, they look
    fine on tv. Michelin XWX. I think I got maybe 10k at most. Very sticky
    tire, but not linear breakaway.

    Greg

  6. #6
    AJL
    Guest AJL's Avatar

    Default Correct Tire Pressure?

    On Fri, 20 Apr 2012 02:55:23 +0000 (UTC), gregz <zekor@............>
    wrote:

    >AJL <13wim55@pleasenomail.com> wrote:
    >> On Wed, 18 Apr 2012 09:38:17 -0700 (PDT), Robert11
    >> <rgsrose@............> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Have a 2009 Buick LaCrosse.

    >>
    >>> Car sticker says to set at 30 psi

    >>
    >> My 2004 Buick Century (bought new) also says to set it at 30 psi all
    >> around. That seemed a little low to me too. I have compromised at 32
    >> psi all these years. Probably my imagination but it seems to make the
    >> ride a bit harder. Perhaps Buick specifies 30 psi to give this low end
    >> Buick a softer ride? It currently has 22K miles on it (don't use it
    >> much) and the tires still look new, no noticeable wear patterns. Now I
    >> have to decide when to replace them because of old age (now 8 years
    >> old). I've read different opinions on the matter but the consensus
    >> seems to be 10 years. Opinions here?

    >
    >I never got that much milage from tires. If kept indoors, they should be
    >good. I had one set on a car for longer,


    This car has been garaged its whole life.

    >but you could start to feel the
    >dryness, and some cracking. Cracking occurred with me on a set of
    >performance michelins in less than two years.


    No noticeable cracks or drying in my tires.

    >Did a lot of armor all, which
    >I suspect was the major reason,


    This car only gets washed 3 or 4 times a year so no excess Armor
    All... Though I was under the impression that Armor All protected
    the tires from sun damage.

    >aside from being in the outdoors, in the
    >desert.


    I also live in a desert climate (Phoenix) and the summer is especially
    hard on tires.

    >I think you have to worry about the inner layers which you can't
    >see.


    Yup. That's what I wonder about. There seems to be a wide range of
    opinion on the matter.

  7. #7
    gregz
    Guest gregz's Avatar

    Default Correct Tire Pressure?

    AJL <13wim55@pleasenomail.com> wrote:
    > On Fri, 20 Apr 2012 02:55:23 +0000 (UTC), gregz <zekor@............>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> AJL <13wim55@pleasenomail.com> wrote:
    >>> On Wed, 18 Apr 2012 09:38:17 -0700 (PDT), Robert11
    >>> <rgsrose@............> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Have a 2009 Buick LaCrosse.
    >>>
    >>>> Car sticker says to set at 30 psi
    >>>
    >>> My 2004 Buick Century (bought new) also says to set it at 30 psi all
    >>> around. That seemed a little low to me too. I have compromised at 32
    >>> psi all these years. Probably my imagination but it seems to make the
    >>> ride a bit harder. Perhaps Buick specifies 30 psi to give this low end
    >>> Buick a softer ride? It currently has 22K miles on it (don't use it
    >>> much) and the tires still look new, no noticeable wear patterns. Now I
    >>> have to decide when to replace them because of old age (now 8 years
    >>> old). I've read different opinions on the matter but the consensus
    >>> seems to be 10 years. Opinions here?

    >>
    >> I never got that much milage from tires. If kept indoors, they should be
    >> good. I had one set on a car for longer,

    >
    > This car has been garaged its whole life.
    >
    >> but you could start to feel the
    >> dryness, and some cracking. Cracking occurred with me on a set of
    >> performance michelins in less than two years.

    >
    > No noticeable cracks or drying in my tires.
    >
    >> Did a lot of armor all, which
    >> I suspect was the major reason,

    >
    > This car only gets washed 3 or 4 times a year so no excess Armor
    > All... Though I was under the impression that Armor All protected
    > the tires from sun damage.
    >


    I heard of more horror stories with the stuff I used in the 70s. At least
    the newer stuff has uv protector. Tires cracked, dash cracked also. You
    will have less performance once the rubber gets dry. I like to take it out
    and do some hard driving to expose fresher rubber. Not sure how old the
    tires are on my datsun. They look fresh. 66 roadster. I previously was a
    one owner 77 z. 32 years. Went through 4 sets of tires, at 67k miles.

    Greg

    Greg


    >> aside from being in the outdoors, in the
    >> desert.

    >
    > I also live in a desert climate (Phoenix) and the summer is especially
    > hard on tires.
    >
    >> I think you have to worry about the inner layers which you can't
    >> see.

    >
    > Yup. That's what I wonder about. There seems to be a wide range of
    > opinion on the matter.

  8. #8
    ckozicki
    Guest ckozicki's Avatar

    Default Correct Tire Pressure?

    This is the best option on here I would recommend, and I do it myself - running 1-2psi over the door sticker. Depends on the profile though, and even just a pound over on lower profiles(55 or 50 or 45 series tires) might roughen up the ride undesirably. With 60series and up you have have more sidewall compliance, hence more room for experimentation. The chalk method does not work for me; I draw two lines across each tire - from the sidewall across the tread. By the time I've gone up & down my driveway it is ALL gone. smh!!!

  9. #9
    gpsman
    Guest gpsman's Avatar

    Default Correct Tire Pressure?

    On Apr 21, 1:19.pm, ckozi...@snet.net wrote:
    > The chalk method does not work for me; I draw two lines across each tire - from the sidewall across the tread. By the time I've gone up & down my driveway it is ALL gone.


    You don't need chalk, you can tell by the wear pattern.

    Tires have a range of pressures. If the pattern is rolling over the
    edge even ever so slightly to the sidewall, it's under-inflated. If
    it doesn't reach the edge, it's overinflated.
    --

    - gpsman

  10. #10
    jim beam
    Guest jim beam's Avatar

    Default Correct Tire Pressure?

    On 04/22/2012 01:48 PM, gpsman wrote:
    > On Apr 21, 1:19�pm, ckozi...@snet.net wrote:
    >> The chalk method does not work for me; I draw two lines across each
    >> tire - from the sidewall across the tread. By the time I've gone
    >> up& down my driveway it is ALL gone.

    >
    > You don't need chalk, you can tell by the wear pattern.
    >
    > Tires have a range of pressures. If the pattern is rolling over the
    > edge even ever so slightly to the sidewall, it's under-inflated. If
    > it doesn't reach the edge, it's overinflated. --
    >
    > - gpsman
    >


    for normal "pedestrian" applications, this is largely true. but for
    more sporting applications, or at least, driving that doesn't involve
    going in a straight line, some of the performance tires have sloped
    tread shoulders which don't normally touch the road, but which are
    designed to gradually lay more rubber as lateral force increases.
    "pedestrian" tires don't have this of course, and their edges are quite
    sharp so the tire type is easy to distinguish. so, with regard to
    pressure, not reaching the edge doesn't mean it's over-inflated if it's
    a tire whose edge is rolled.

    --
    nomina rutrum rutrum

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