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Thread: Bikes: Fluorescent paint on bike frames

  1. #1
    Derek C
    Guest Derek C's Avatar

    Default Bikes: Fluorescent paint on bike frames

    The other night I came across a cyclist with no lights, so no change
    there then! However the front and rear forks of his mountain bike
    were painted with fluorescent paint, so it showed up really well. I
    thought this was a really good idea for improving cyclist safety at
    night. So many bikes (including mine) are finished in dark
    colours,which are difficult to see in the dark, especially if there
    are no lights fitted and the cyclist is also wearing dark, non-
    reflective clothes.

    Derek C

  2. #2
    Marc
    Guest Marc's Avatar

    Default Bikes: Fluorescent paint on bike frames

    On 22 Sep, 12:18, Derek C <del.copel...@tiscali.co.uk> wrote:
    > The other night I came across a cyclist with no lights, so no change
    > there then! .However the front and rear forks of his mountain bike
    > were painted with fluorescent paint, so it showed up really well. I
    > thought this was a really good idea for improving cyclist safety at
    > night. .So many bikes (including mine) are finished in dark
    > colours,which are difficult to see in the dark, especially if there
    > are no lights fitted and the cyclist is also wearing dark, non-
    > reflective clothes.
    >

    Fluorescents don't show up any better in the dark than normal
    finishes, they need UV Light to flouresce. Your lack of physics is
    letting your argument down, again.

  3. #3
    Derek C
    Guest Derek C's Avatar

    Default Bikes: Fluorescent paint on bike frames

    On Sep 22, 1:20.pm, Marc <webtr...@sky.com> wrote:
    > On 22 Sep, 12:18, Derek C <del.copel...@tiscali.co.uk> wrote:> The other night I came across a cyclist with no lights, so no change
    > > there then! .However the front and rear forks of his mountain bike
    > > were painted with fluorescent paint, so it showed up really well. I
    > > thought this was a really good idea for improving cyclist safety at
    > > night. .So many bikes (including mine) are finished in dark
    > > colours,which are difficult to see in the dark, especially if there
    > > are no lights fitted and the cyclist is also wearing dark, non-
    > > reflective clothes.

    >
    > Fluorescents don't show up any better in the dark than .normal
    > finishes, they need UV Light to flouresce. Your lack of physics is
    > letting your argument down, again.


    The bike certainly showed up well in my car headlights. Fluorescence
    only requires that light is re-emitted at a longer wavelength than the
    incoming light source, so it doesn't have to be UV!

    Derek C

  4. #4
    mileburner
    Guest mileburner's Avatar

    Default Bikes: Fluorescent paint on bike frames

    Derek C wrote:
    > On Sep 22, 1:20 pm, Marc <webtr...@sky.com> wrote:
    >> On 22 Sep, 12:18, Derek C <del.copel...@tiscali.co.uk> wrote:> The
    >> other night I came across a cyclist with no lights, so no change
    >>> there then! However the front and rear forks of his mountain bike
    >>> were painted with fluorescent paint, so it showed up really well. I
    >>> thought this was a really good idea for improving cyclist safety at
    >>> night. So many bikes (including mine) are finished in dark
    >>> colours,which are difficult to see in the dark, especially if there
    >>> are no lights fitted and the cyclist is also wearing dark, non-
    >>> reflective clothes.

    >>
    >> Fluorescents don't show up any better in the dark than normal
    >> finishes, they need UV Light to flouresce. Your lack of physics is
    >> letting your argument down, again.

    >
    > The bike certainly showed up well in my car headlights. Fluorescence
    > only requires that light is re-emitted at a longer wavelength than the
    > incoming light source, so it doesn't have to be UV!


    I have noticed that brightly coloured bikes show up better in the dark and
    with me being a great fan of High-Vis clothing, reflectors, flashing lights
    as well as blue lights, I would have bought one. The only colour they had
    when I bought mine though was black and grey.

    It's like buying a kids winter coat for school, they come in black or
    navy...

  5. #5
    Marc
    Guest Marc's Avatar

    Default Bikes: Fluorescent paint on bike frames

    On 23 Sep, 05:14, Derek C <del.copel...@tiscali.co.uk> wrote:
    > On Sep 22, 1:20.pm, Marc <webtr...@sky.com> wrote:
    >
    > > On 22 Sep, 12:18, Derek C <del.copel...@tiscali.co.uk> wrote:> The other night I came across a cyclist with no lights, so no change
    > > > there then! .However the front and rear forks of his mountain bike
    > > > were painted with fluorescent paint, so it showed up really well. I
    > > > thought this was a really good idea for improving cyclist safety at
    > > > night. .So many bikes (including mine) are finished in dark
    > > > colours,which are difficult to see in the dark, especially if there
    > > > are no lights fitted and the cyclist is also wearing dark, non-
    > > > reflective clothes.

    >
    > > Fluorescents don't show up any better in the dark than .normal
    > > finishes, they need UV Light to flouresce. Your lack of physics is
    > > letting your argument down, again.

    >
    > The bike certainly showed up well in my car headlights.


    That's your measurement of whether it was a fluorescent finish?

    > Fluorescence
    > only requires that light is re-emitted at a longer wavelength than the
    > incoming light source, so it doesn't have to be UV!


    Good use of Wikipedia.

  6. #6
    Derek C
    Guest Derek C's Avatar

    Default Bikes: Fluorescent paint on bike frames

    On Sep 24, 8:48.am, Marc <webtr...@sky.com> wrote:
    > On 23 Sep, 05:14, Derek C <del.copel...@tiscali.co.uk> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Sep 22, 1:20.pm, Marc <webtr...@sky.com> wrote:

    >
    > > > On 22 Sep, 12:18, Derek C <del.copel...@tiscali.co.uk> wrote:> The other night I came across a cyclist with no lights, so no change
    > > > > there then! .However the front and rear forks of his mountain bike
    > > > > were painted with fluorescent paint, so it showed up really well. I
    > > > > thought this was a really good idea for improving cyclist safety at
    > > > > night. .So many bikes (including mine) are finished in dark
    > > > > colours,which are difficult to see in the dark, especially if there
    > > > > are no lights fitted and the cyclist is also wearing dark, non-
    > > > > reflective clothes.

    >
    > > > Fluorescents don't show up any better in the dark than .normal
    > > > finishes, they need UV Light to flouresce. Your lack of physics is
    > > > letting your argument down, again.

    >
    > > The bike certainly showed up well in my car headlights.

    >
    > That's your measurement of whether it was a fluorescent finish?
    >
    > > Fluorescence
    > > only requires that light is re-emitted at a longer wavelength than the
    > > incoming light source, so it doesn't have to be UV!

    >
    > Good use of Wikipedia.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    I happen to be a retired former atomic spectroscopist, so I didn't
    need Wikipedia to tell me that! The forks on this particular bike
    appeared to positively glow in my car headlights, so I don't think it
    was reflection. Maybe they were radioactive!

  7. #7
    Tony Raven
    Guest Tony Raven's Avatar

    Default Bikes: Fluorescent paint on bike frames

    Derek C wrote:
    > On Sep 24, 8:48 am, Marc <webtr...@sky.com> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>> Fluorescence only requires that light is re-emitted at a longer
    >>> wavelength than the incoming light source, so it doesn't have to
    >>> be UV!

    >> Good use of Wikipedia.- Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > I happen to be a retired former atomic spectroscopist, so I didn't
    > need Wikipedia to tell me that! The forks on this particular bike
    > appeared to positively glow in my car headlights, so I don't think it
    > was reflection. Maybe they were radioactive!


    Fluorescence can make things brighter in two ways. First, as in the
    whiter than white washing powders, by converting UV light into visible
    light thereby increasing the amount of visible light coming of the
    object above that which is reflected. Anyone who's worn a freshly
    washed shirt to a disco can see the effect. Caps and crowns have a
    small amount of fluorescent material in them so they match that of
    natural teeth otherwise you could have a very gappy smile at a disco.
    Car headlights have very little UV in them though because most is
    blocked by the glass

    The other is to move light around in the spectrum. The eye is far more
    sensitive to yellow-green light than it is to blue or red. So shifting
    visible blue light into the green or yellow can make it appear brighter.
    The sorts of compounds that can do that are unlikely to be in paints

    I doubt that its either of those though and suspect its just paint
    loaded with retro-reflective beads which do a very good job of
    reflecting the headlight light back to where it came from. Since your
    eyes are not far from the headlights you get a pretty strong glow from
    such paints.

    Tony

  8. #8
    Derek C
    Guest Derek C's Avatar

    Default Bikes: Fluorescent paint on bike frames

    On Sep 24, 11:46.am, Tony Raven <tra...@gotadsl.co.uk> wrote:
    > Derek C wrote:
    > > On Sep 24, 8:48 am, Marc <webtr...@sky.com> wrote:

    >
    > >>> Fluorescence only requires that light is re-emitted at a longer
    > >>> wavelength than the incoming light source, so it doesn't have to
    > >>> be UV!
    > >> Good use of Wikipedia.- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > > I happen to be a retired former atomic spectroscopist, so I didn't
    > > need Wikipedia to tell me that! The forks on this particular bike
    > > appeared to positively glow in my car headlights, so I don't think it
    > > .was reflection. Maybe they were radioactive!

    >
    > Fluorescence can make things brighter in two ways. .First, as in the
    > whiter than white washing powders, by converting UV light into visible
    > light thereby increasing the amount of visible light coming of the
    > object above that which is reflected. .Anyone who's worn a freshly
    > washed shirt to a disco can see the effect. .Caps and crowns have a
    > small amount of fluorescent material in them so they match that of
    > natural teeth otherwise you could have a very gappy smile at a disco.
    > Car headlights have very little UV in them though because most is
    > blocked by the glass
    >
    > The other is to move light around in the spectrum. .The eye is far more
    > sensitive to yellow-green light than it is to blue or red. .So shifting
    > visible blue light into the green or yellow can make it appear brighter.
    > . The sorts of compounds that can do that are unlikely to be in paints
    >
    > I doubt that its either of those though and suspect its just paint
    > loaded with retro-reflective beads which do a very good job of
    > reflecting the headlight light back to where it came from. .Since your
    > eyes are not far from the headlights you get a pretty strong glow from
    > such paints.
    >
    > Tony


    I have high output bulbs in my car headlights which give out a
    slightly bluish light, but the bikes forks seemed to be re-emitting a
    yellow colour that was far brighter than you would expect from a pure
    reflection. Unfortunately I wasn't able to note the make or type of
    the bike.

    Derek

  9. #9
    Tony Raven
    Guest Tony Raven's Avatar

    Default Bikes: Fluorescent paint on bike frames

    Derek C <del.copeland@tiscali.co.uk> wrote:.
    >
    > Talking of pedantry, my car is definitely fitted with high output
    > headlight bulbs (H7 type). Sealed beam lamp units are pretty rare
    > these days.
    >


    But their UV output is still pretty minimal as you would know if you
    really were an atomic spectroscopist as you claim.

    --
    Tony

  10. #10
    Derek C
    Guest Derek C's Avatar

    Default Bikes: Fluorescent paint on bike frames

    On Sep 26, 12:58.am, Clive George <cl...@xxxx-x.fsnet.co.uk> wrote:
    > On 25/09/2010 12:13, Derek C wrote:
    >
    > > Talking of pedantry, my car is definitely fitted with high output
    > > headlight bulbs (H7 type).

    >
    > What makes them high output? You wouldn't be running illegally high
    > power lamps would you?


    No they are the normal 55W. The bulbs are filled with xenon inert gas
    which allows the filaments to operate at higher temperatures, hence
    the blueish tinge.

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